onLine weblog archive

Friday, March 29, 2002

PPK on accessing stylesheets with JavaScript.

Thursday, March 28, 2002

From Usability News: A Comparison of Popular Online Fonts: Which Size and Type is Best?

Wednesday, March 27, 2002

Hee hee: TAKE ADVANTAGE OF CSS BY DOWNLOADING MICROSOFT INTERNET EXPLORER 3.0.
Real Audio streams of a 1999 MIT lecture series by Stanford's Donald Knuth: God and Computers.
Nice: Indirection as it relates to game design.
Ann Woodlief's Web Study Texts feature pop-up study notes on key words in a fine collection of literary texts.
Stewart pointed me here: DomAPI - Web Construction Kit.

Tuesday, March 26, 2002

The Content-type Saga
This page attempts to demystify the HTTP Content-type and its relationship to browser configuration.
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offLine journal archive

where everything else is discussed

Wednesday, March 27, 2002

Abraham Lincoln:
I see in the near future a crisis approaching that unnerves me and causes me to tremble for the safety of my country. . . . corporations have been enthroned and an era of corruption in high places will follow, and the money power of the country will endeavor to prolong its reign by working upon the prejudices of the people until all wealth is aggregated in a few hands and the Republic is destroyed.
Take that Michael Eisner.

Monday, March 25, 2002

Some of the funniest writing ever in Salon's Oscars 2002: Somebody make it stop!:
I must warn the world about Tom Cruise. I feel he is an utterly terrifying Superior Life Form, with the power to melt heads and braid spines. His eyes are as hard, shiny and brutally penetrating as diamond drill-bits. The new braces on his teeth suggest that he is erasing all that remained of his tiny imperfections, and he is now metamorphosing into Ultra Super Perfection Man 3000. I fear his intense, mind-beating politeness, his titanium imperviousness to human weakness, his barking power-laugh.

"Movies make a little bit of magic touch our lives," he commanded us to acknowledge, with steely resolve and Mach-5 mega-humorlessness.

People in the audience started laughing, until they realized that Tom was Not Being Funny At All. He was chosen to frankly address the post-Sept. 11 whither-the-Oscars conundrum head on. "Should we celebrate the magic the movies bring? Now?" Tom asked, his eyes boring into the eyes of the TV multitudes and implanting rays of total domination. "Dare I say it?" He flashed a smirk with his robotically flawless teeth. "More than EVER," he hissed, laying on his most Extreme Scientological Unction. He had been commanded by the Elders to Obi-Wan-Kenobi-ize the audience into re-believing in the importance of the obscenely superfluous Oscars. Tom Cruise is becoming the Scary Flaming Eye from "The Lord of the Rings," and I fear that nobody can stop him.
archives: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49