onLine weblog archive

Friday, March 15, 2002

Simon St. Laurent say Macromedia reinvents the Web:
Remember the scene in Aliens where the baby alien emerges from the guy's stomach? Flash has been tunneling deeply in the innards of browsers and web site development, and its latest iteration (Flash MX) looks like a full-blown attempt to emerge and kill its host in the process.
[thanks webgraphics]
Tantek offers a new CSS hack for hiding stylesheets from less capable browsers: High Pass Filter.
Another 3 column CSS layout that works in NS4, this time with header and footer.
CSS: The True Language of Web Design, Part I: The Separation of Presentation from Document Structure by Molly E. Holzschlag:
CSS has been around for a long time, but the main problem has not been with CSS, rather, browser support problems for CSS. But with the release of Netscape 6.x browsers, and the prevalence of IE browsers along with somewhat less common but CSS-savvy browsers such as Opera, we can now begin to turn to CSS for at least some of our design concerns.

Thursday, March 14, 2002

eval() - not a magic bullet
Lets talk about what eval() is really for. It's a last resort. That's *all* it is. You should never, ever use eval() when there is another option open to you.
Flash: More than just eye candy details the web application aspirations of Flash as a development plaform. What a place we find ourselves: caught in between DHTML with its inconsistent browser implementations, and Flash, with its closed, proprietary code. The future of client-side web apps seems very unclear to me.
In other news, my Apple article on Remote Scripting with an IFRAME has been revised with code that works with IE5 PC, a browser which does not allow dynamic creation and automation of iframe elements. We dound a way around that, you'd better believe!

In other other news, I answered some questions for Dan at 13th Parallel and you can read my answers here. In response to the question "What is the www?" I really should have given Derek's definition of the internet: "The power of computers writ large."

Tuesday, March 12, 2002

Xml Extras from WebFX:
The usage of XML is everywhere. The usage of XML inside the browser has been around for a while but not until lately has it been possible to get this to work in a satisfactory way in more than one browser. A while back Mozilla added support for creating MS compatible XML classes scriptable from JavaScript.

This script creates a common interface for Mozilla and IE and also extends the Mozilla classes a little to make them behave even more like the Microsoft interfaces.

Monday, March 11, 2002

Oh Happy day! AOL embraces Linux and Mozilla, plans to drop MS Explorer:
Sources inside AOL and Red Hat say AOL is making a major internal switch to Linux, and the long-rumored AOL default browser switch from Microsoft's Internet Explorer to Mozilla -- or at least Mozilla's Gecko rendering engine -- is well under way.
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Thursday, March 14, 2002

Orwell: Politics and the English Language
Most people who bother with the matter at all would admit that the English language is in a bad way, but it is generally assumed that we cannot by conscious action do anything about it. Our civilization is decadent and our language -- so the argument runs -- must inevitably share in the general collapse. It follows that any struggle against the abuse of language is a sentimental archaism, like preferring candles to electric light or hansom cabs to aeroplanes. Underneath this lies the half-conscious belief that language is a natural growth and not an instrument which we shape for our own purposes.
glish.com it is I stud Eric (translated from English to Italian back to English).

Monday, March 11, 2002

Life seems especially harsh to me lately, after recently watching In Cold Blood, then Judgment at Nuremberg, then that documentary last night. I think It'll be rough to watch the Tribute of Light which starts tonight. At least there are stories like this: Six Months Later, Scarred but Very Alive:
She walked through two sets of doors into the lobby of the north tower shortly before 9 a.m., and heard "a whistle, the loudest sound you can possibly imagine," she said. She still does not know for sure what it was, but thinks it may have been the elevators plunging down their shafts. She had no idea that a jet had hit the building.

After the sound came the fireball, exploding from the elevators where jet fuel had cascaded down the shafts.

"The fire hit me and spun me around and half pushed me out the doors," she said. She pushed open the second set of doors, which were searing hot, and ran outside. She was aflame, in agony. And, she said, "screaming to God, 'Please let me live for Tyler and Greg. Please. Please.' And I do believe he did."
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