onLine weblog archive

Saturday, March 10, 2001

Beautiful, useful and new: KUMO : the W3 Programming Weblog. Found in my referrer logs.
This proves it! The media misuse statistics to sensationalize the mundane truth! You heard it here first!
A wonderful bit of CSS to keep IE5 Mac from displaying that horrific link outline that appears on focus (when you click on it): a {outline:none}

Friday, March 09, 2001

Also, I meant to apologize for not having kept up with your weblog. I've just been so busy! And I also meant to say that wonderful and exciting things are afoot, and I'm having fun. If you don't yet have a weblog, start one; you'll meet nice people.
Ok, so I feel like I need to explain myself a little bit. Glish.com used to have more than just web development links on it; I used to link to articles of general interest, and I also used to discuss my life. A little. Lately though, as you've noticed, it has been all HTML this and CSS that.

Well I plan to make some changes, and I hope to do it soon. I want to adopt a multi-column layout that allows for me to post all the development links I want in one column, and along side of that keep posts of a more general and possibly personal nature. So those of you that don't care about my daughter's potty habits can easily ignore my narcissistic journaling, and those of you that don't know or care what XML is can just get the personal goods without the irrelevant techno babble (hi Mom and Dad!).

I don't know if this is a good idea, because you can't please all the people all the time and all that, but it is an experiment I have been wanting to try. Others are of course already doing similar things, so I am not being terribly original. But I want to see if it makes things better here.

So any way (techno babble alert), I have been working on this new aforementioned layout, which I want to accomplish with DIVs and CSS in a standards compliant, next generation sort of way, which has forced me to dig in to some research and experiments on CSS layout (also I was supposed to write an article on the topic months ago; sorry Jeffrey) and all of this has taken up a lot of time recently. Along with a recent series of software and hardware upgrades at our little server farm, launching the 2001 5k contest, worrying about financing on the buildings we are trying to buy in NY, starting a new paying project, and etc. etc. And that I hope explains why there has not been much new at glish.com. Well, except for the CSS layout tests, which have been enormously popular.

Which brings me to my next point: I am developing a mini-site here at glish.com that will provide a listing of CSS layout techniques, and links to external resources for learning about CSS in general in addition to advanced level guides and tutorials. Coming Soon. In the meantime, can you tell me what your favorite CSS resources are?
If your name is Michel and you emailed me asking for permission to use my photos on your site, please feel free. If your name is not Michel and you did not email mail, or even if you did email me, please also feel free to use my photos on your site. Just give me a link and we'll call it even.

Also, If your name is Michel and you emailed me, the email address you gave me does not work.

Thursday, March 08, 2001

More good multi-column CSS layout work: Statik Majik.

Wednesday, March 07, 2001

Update! I have launched a CSS resource for web designers and developers: CSS Layout Techniques.

First of all, I was wrong: Neale's 3 column layout does not depend on JavaScript, and it is a thing of beauty. After working all last evening on some more CSS layout experiments, I got an email from Owen linking to a fantastic little resource he put together that explains the technique Neale uses. In short, it combines absolutely positioned DIVs that hug the browser window's edges, and a fluid content DIV in between with right and left margins that equal the widths of the flanking DIVs.

This morning I read through all of Owen's tutorial, studied the code, and built my own 3 column liquid CSS layout that works in NS6 and IE5 Mac and PC, and is adequate in and even Opera 5. Here it is: The Holy Grail.

Last night, while I was still trying to figure out how to get a similar layout using the float property, I came up with some serviceable designs. Here's a wacky one, here it is reversed, and here's a more standard one.

You'll notice on those pages some links to a couple of other layout tests I have done. They are just experiments, and I do not endorse the use of any of the techniques you will find there. They are all still under development. I hope to annotate them all with helpful information, but for now at least you can view source for each of them by simply scrolling down. Enjoy!
Jeffrey Zeldman Responds to concerns over the WaSP's recent Browser Upgrade Campaign. You should read this. This is something you should read.

Tuesday, March 06, 2001

Derek found a very cool page of java applets that compare various sorting algorithms.
Everybody is experimenting with DIV and CSS layouts! Porter Glendinning did a 3 panel mock-up of the ALA site, and Zeldman is hacking up his own version of it. But the holy grail of CSS layout seems to be the 3 column layout (not the same as 3 panel layout), preferably with flanking DIVs of a specified width and a middle DIV that adjusts to fill the rest of the window. Something like what Neale has done at wrongwaygoback.com, but without the JavaScript dependency. I am working on such a layout, but I don't have much hope it can be done with CSS2. Here is someone else's 3 column attempt, filled with a lot of depressing news about how many problems there are with such layouts.

If I had not (like Bill) promised myself I would never *sigh* in any online discourse, I would do it here.
So my band, affectionately referred to as The Brand New Broken Homes, has been readying a CD for release for going on 4 months. We just got back this comp for the cover design:

POLL: Do you like it?


  or view results

Monday, March 05, 2001

As you see announced above, we launched the 2001 5k contest over the weekend. Submissions will be accepted until April 9th, and this year you can submit your entry online. Also new this year: entries will be sorted into two categories, "HTML and CSS" or "Anything Goes", and popular vote will help decide which entries get passed on to the judges.

If you have a weblog, and I know you do, why not help us spread the word?
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